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A Polio Memoir

Small ironlung image

Synopsis

After he had fought in Pacific battles of WWII, as well as fifteen months in the Korean Conflict, Captain Axtell still has the toughest battles ahead. He, along with his family, struggles to overcome many obstacles in order to make life as normal and as happy as is possible under the circumstances. Although prevention of Polio is possible now, Post-Polio Syndrome is still a relentless factor in the lives of its victims.

On the left is an actual photo of Captain Axtell in an iron lung, taken in 1952 at the William Beaumont Army Hospital.

 

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